Here's me a week after I lost my hair from chemotherapy. An equally terrifying and liberating experience!  I will never be so attached to something so unimportant again.  

Here's me a week after I lost my hair from chemotherapy. An equally terrifying and liberating experience!  I will never be so attached to something so unimportant again.  

Here are a few pictures from my own "Dhremo" journey.  My son and I were gearing up with our best super hero powers.   My first day of Dhremo with my husband. Some of my original Dhremo decals as I used them.  And then there's my last day, I dressed up like a breast cancer runner hitting the finish line.  
 

My Story

Cancer is scary.  The treatment is scary.  No one really truly understands this journey unless you go through it yourself.  I have and I want to share with you my story and why I created Dhremo.   

In June of 2014 I received the unexpected and terrifying news that I had stage II breast cancer.  With surgery, four rounds of chemotherapy and another month and a half of daily radiation prescribed, I knew I had quite the adventure ahead of me.   The more I read about who survives this scary adventure, the more I realized this is not just a physical thing, you have to believe you will.  You have to have your head in the right place and heal the spirit and mind along with the body.  Even my Oncologist (who at the time I believed to be all about research, evidence and numbers) said to me that trusting my treatment decision was ultimately more important than which treatment I chose.  That made me pause.  I was determined to not focus on the fear, but instead see this journey through cancer treatment as an opportunity to grow, to let go of what was not serving me, and to focus on love and wellness. 

This was all great, until I took a walk through the chemotherapy infusion room.  It was cold, sterile, and lacked a feeling of healing, life and vitality. Everyone looked sick.  Even the word “Chemo” sounded like chemicals.  Not to mention the IV bags were adorned with caution stickers and toxic sounding names:  Cytoxin, Taxotere.  How was I going to be okay with this?  I was scared.

 One of the greatest gifts I was given leading up to the start of my treatment was a chat with my dear friend Heather, who was also a nurse and yoga teacher.  In listening to my fears, she suggested I imagine the chemo infusions to be something else entirely– like light or love.  Well, that’s all it took.  Not only would I imagine it to be so, I would re-label the chemo entirely!  As an artist and sculptor, I realized I had the power to create a new space and a new mindset.  I could infuse myself with whatever I wanted to dream up.   This would not be “Chemo-therapy” this was going to be “Dhremo-therapy”; and it certainly didn’t have to be a nightmare. 

And so I began designing a set of makeshift labels that I printed on my home printer. Every round I printed more, and started giving them to others.  I would ask myself and others what was needed the most- and those were the words I’d use.  I noticed what a difference this made for everyone around me.   I actually looked forward to infusion days, and would come up with new concoctions each time.  I’d truly imagine the infusions were these new formulas.  I would laugh with the nurses about how I was feeling giddy from my “Happiness Formula”, or already feeling more energy from the “Vitality Mixture”.   They would come by and check on my progress with my “Hope Serum”, and prepare a “Clarity Infusion” for me.   I absolutely believe the mindfulness, and positive attitude these helped me to maintain during my treatment were much of the reason I did so well, and was given a diagnosis of remission.   

 I’m so pleased to share these with you.  My hope is that these will be “re-MIND-ers” to help you focus on the light that is guiding you through this journey.  I believe in miracles and I believe you can be one too.   Wishing you the best in your treatment, and hope you can see the light hiding in the shadows.  

 

Marsha

Mom, Artist, "Dhremer" and Cancer Survivor